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NASA

To Live

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by Viktoria Vidali on November 16, 2016

in Quotations

I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet. The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. ~ Jack London

[NASA image courtesy of Jeff Berkes.]

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Orion

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by Orlando Vidali on February 15, 2015

in General,Guest Writers,Poetry

Pull me out to you Orion.
Your song in vacuum is siren.
The cells of my form align upwards
Thrumming the rhythm of cosmic rays.
continue reading …

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Cosmic Light Show

by Viktoria Vidali on December 18, 2014

in Great Things To Share

NGC 2207 and IC 2163 are two spiral galaxies in the process of merging.

This image is a mash-up of X-rays captured by NASA’s Chandra X-Ray Observatory (shown in pink), visible light data from the Hubble Space Telescope (shown in red, green, and blue), and infrared data from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope (shown in red). What makes NGC 2207 and IC 2163 look so dazzling? Together, the galaxies are home to 28 separate “ultraluminous” X-ray sources. The X-rays they produce are more intense than those produced by most star systems.

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Butterfly Nebula

by Viktoria Vidali on October 1, 2014

in Great Things To Share

panel1_butterfly_nebula

The bright clusters and nebulae of planet Earth’s night sky are often named for flowers or insects. Though its wingspan covers over 3 light-years, NGC 6302 is no exception. With an estimated surface temperature of about 250,000 degrees C, the dying central star of this particular planetary nebula has become exceptionally hot, shining brightly in ultraviolet light but hidden from direct view by a dense torus of dust.

This sharp close-up of the dying star’s nebula was recorded in 2009 by the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3, and is presented here in reprocessed colors. Cutting across a bright cavity of ionized gas, the dust torus surrounding the central star is near the center of this view, almost edge-on to the line-of-sight. Molecular hydrogen has been detected in the hot star’s dusty cosmic shroud. NGC 6302 lies about 4,000 light-years away in the arachnologically correct constellation of the Scorpion (Scorpius).

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team; reprocessing and copyright: Francesco Antonucci.

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Because

by Viktoria Vidali on June 25, 2014

in Great Things To Share

Time lapse sequences of photographs taken with a special low-light 4K-camera by the crew of expedition 28 & 29 onboard the International Space Station from August to October, 2011. All credit goes to them.

Soundtrack: a cappella and original versions of Because by The Beatles.

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Fire Rainbows

by Viktoria Vidali on May 19, 2014

in Great Things To Share

fire_rainbowSo-called “fire rainbows” (or circumhorizontal arcs) are neither on fire nor are rainbows, but they are definitely stunning. Technically known as “iridescent clouds” (a relatively rare phenomenon caused by clouds of water droplets of nearly uniform size, according to a release by NASA), these clouds diffract or bend light in a similar manner, which separates out light into different wavelengths, or colors.

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Everywhere And Always

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by Viktoria Vidali on March 29, 2014

in Quotations

When Here becomes Everywhere and Now becomes Always, then one has succeeded. ~ Anonymous

[Image: Milky Way Galaxy, NASA.]

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Space Violets

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by Viktoria Vidali on February 24, 2014

in General

In 1984, 25,000 Optimara seeds were launched into space aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) as part of a NASA program to test the effect of long-term exposure to cosmic radiation and lack of gravity. With schedules running late, the intended 1 year test stretched to 6 and in January 1990, the LDEF was recovered by Space Shuttle Columbia on Mission STS-32.
continue reading …

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You Are Welcome, Welcome

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by Viktoria Vidali on February 1, 2014

in General,Poetry

COME when the nights are bright with stars
Or when the moon is mellow;
Come when the sun his golden bars
Drops on the hay-field yellow.
Come in the twilight soft and gray,
Come in the night or come in the day,
Come, O love, whene’er you may,
And you are welcome, welcome.
continue reading …

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The Attitude Of Faith

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by Viktoria Vidali on December 17, 2013

in Quotations

But the attitude of faith is to let go, and become open to truth, whatever it might turn out to be. ~ Alan Watts

[Image: Bubble Nebula, NASA.]

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